Obstetrics and Neonatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women with COVID-19: A Systematic Review

  • Mojdeh BANAEI Mother and Child Welfare Research Center, Hormozgan University of Medical Sciences, Bandar Abbas, Iran AND Student Research Committee, Department of Midwifery and Reproductive Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Be-heshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Vida GHASEMI Mail Student Research Committee, Department of Midwifery and Reproductive Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Be-heshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran AND School of Medicine, Asadabad University of Medical Sciences, Asadabad, Iran
  • Marzieh SAEI GHARE NAZ Student Research Committee, Department of Midwifery and Reproductive Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Be-heshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Zahra KIANI Student Research Committee, Department of Midwifery and Reproductive Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Be-heshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Farzaneh RASHIDI-FAKARI Student Research Committee, Department of Midwifery and Reproductive Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Be-heshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Sedigheh BANAEI BANAEI Department of Radiology, Afzalipour School of Medicine, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran
  • Behzad MOHAMMAD SOURI Urology and Nephrology Research Center, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
  • Mohsen ROKNI Department of Immunology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran AND Department of Immunology, Buali Hospital of Laboratory, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran
Keywords:
Pregnancy, Neonate, Outcome, Coronavirus infection, COVID-19

Abstract

Background: Considering that the obstetricians and pediatricians need to comprehensive information about the obstetric and neonatal effect of COVID-19, this review study was conducted to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on obstetrics and neonatal outcomes.

Methods: In this systematic review the international search databases following PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, ProQuest and Embase and Google scholar were searched. All articles were reviewed by two independent researchers until 10 April 2020. After quality assessment of included studies the finding reported in 2 sections obstetrics and neonatal outcomes.

Results: The sixteen studies with a sample size of 123 pregnant women with a definitive diagnosis of COVID-19 and their neonates were evaluated. The range of gestational age was 25-40 weeks. There was no death associated with COVID-19 in pregnant women. The obstetric outcomes in pregnant women with COVID-19 include decreased fetal movement, intrauterine fetal distress, anemia, PROM, preterm labor, Multiple Organ Dysfunction Syndrome (MODS) and etc. The most common delivery mode in women affect with COVID-19 was cesarean section. Expect for one case with MODS, in the majority of the studies reviewed, no severe morbidity or mortality occurred. The neonatal outcomes were stillbirth, prematurity, asphyxia, fetal distress, low birth weight, small for gestational age, large for gestational age, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation and neonatal death. In addition, five neonates born to mothers with COVID-19 were positive for SARS-CoV-2. However, the studies report these outcomes but the exact causes of theme are not known.

Conclusion: In this systematic review, we summarize the diverse results of studies about the obstetrics and neonatal outcomes following COVID-19. This infection may cause negative outcomes in both mothers and neonates. However, there were evidence about neonate infected with COVID-19, but there is controversial information about the vertical transmission of COVID-19.

 

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Published
2020-04-28
How to Cite
1.
BANAEI M, GHASEMI V, SAEI GHARE NAZ M, KIANI Z, RASHIDI-FAKARI F, BANAEI SB, MOHAMMAD SOURI B, ROKNI M. Obstetrics and Neonatal Outcomes in Pregnant Women with COVID-19: A Systematic Review. Iran J Public Health. 49(Supple 1):38-47.
Section
Review Article(s)