A New Self-Reported Assessment Measure for COVID-19 Anxiety Scale (CDAS) in Iran: A Web-Based Study

  • Ahmad ALIPOUR Department of Psychology, Payame Noor University, Tehran, Iran
  • Abolfazl GHADAMI Department of Assessment and Measurement, Allameh Tabatabai University, Tehran, Iran
  • Aida Farsham Department of Psychology, School of Health Psychology, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran
  • Negin DORRI Department of Psychology, School of Health Psychology, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran
Keywords:
Coronavirus, Anxiety, Self-report, Iran.

Abstract

Background: Given the epidemic of Corona disease and its associated anxiety, it is necessary to develop a tool to measure anxiety. This study was conducted to instruct Corona Disease Anxiety Scale (CDAS) to measure the level of anxiety, during the prevalence of the COVID-19 in Iran.

Methods: The present study was considered as applied research in terms of purpose and descriptive-correlational research in terms of methodological. 318 individuals (aged from 18 to 60 years old) completed the Corona Disease Anxiety Scale (CDAS) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) online

Results: Corona Disease Anxiety Scale had a good internal consistency (α=0.91) and good convergent validity, correlating with the GHQ-28 (r=0.49, P>0.01). Exploratory analysis revealed psychological and physical factors. These 2 factor account for 51% of the total variance and 9 items were loaded on every factor.

Conclusion: This scale is reliable and valid scale for measuring Corona anxiety in non-clinical Iranian population.

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Published
2020-06-30
How to Cite
1.
ALIPOUR A, GHADAMI A, Farsham A, DORRI N. A New Self-Reported Assessment Measure for COVID-19 Anxiety Scale (CDAS) in Iran: A Web-Based Study. Iran J Public Health. 49(7):1316-1323.
Section
Original Article(s)