Accuracy of Self-Reported Hypertension, Diabetes, and Hyper-lipidemia among Adults of Liwan, Guangzhou, China

  • Huijie GUO 1. Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, 510006, China 2. Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 510515, China
  • Yi Yu Guangzhou Liwan Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guangzhou, 510176, China
  • Yilu YE Department of Psychiatry, The Fifth Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510700, China
  • Shudong Zhou Mail Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, 510006, China
Keywords:
Hypertension, Diabetes, Hyperlipidemia, Self-reported accuracy

Abstract

Background: We aimed to determine the accuracy of self-reported diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in Chinese adults and examine factors that affect the accuracy of self-reports.

Methods: This representative cross-sectional survey was conducted in Liwan District, Guangzhou City, Southeast China. Self-reported data were collected using a structured questionnaire. Biometrical data were recorded, including blood lipid, blood glucose and arterial blood pressure levels. Sensitivity, specificity, and κ values of self-reports were used as measurements of accuracy or agreements. The Robust Poisson-GEE was applied to determine the association of participants’ characteristics with the accuracy of self-reports.

Results: Self-reported and biometrical data of 1278 residents aged 18 yr and older (693 women and 585 men) were used to calculate three measures of agreement. The agreement between self-reports and biomedical measurements was substantial for both hypertension and diabetes (κ=0.77 and 0.76), but only slight for hyperlipidemia (κ=0.06). Similarly, the sensitivity was higher for hypertension and diabetes (72.3% and 71.2%) than for hyperlipidemia (6.8%), while the specificity was high overall (≥98%). The factors associated with an accurate self-reported diagnosis in respondents with disease included having undergone blood pressure measurement (for hypertension) or blood glucose measurement (for diabetes) in the past 6 month, having attended health knowledge lectures in the past year and having social health insurances (for hypertension), and having undergone physical discomfort in the past 2 weeks (for hypertension and diabetes).

Conclusion: The accuracy of self-reported hypertension and diabetes was high, whereas that of self-reported hyperlipidemia was lower among the population.

Author Biography

Huijie GUO, 1. Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, 510006, China 2. Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 510515, China

School of Public Health, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, China;

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou,China

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Published
2020-08-23
How to Cite
1.
GUO H, Yu Y, YE Y, Zhou S. Accuracy of Self-Reported Hypertension, Diabetes, and Hyper-lipidemia among Adults of Liwan, Guangzhou, China. Iran J Public Health. 49(9):1622-1630.
Section
Original Article(s)