Governance of Iranian Primary Health Care System: Perceptions of Experts

  • Jafar Sadegh TABRIZI Health Services Management Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran and Department of Health Services Management, School of Management and Medical Informatics, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Ta-briz, Iran
  • Faramarz POURASGHAR Road Traffic Injury Prevention Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran and Department of Health Services Management, School of Management and Medical Informatics, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Ta-briz, Iran
  • Raana GHOLAMZADEH NIKJOO Health Services Management Research Center, Iranian Center of Excellence in Health Management, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran and Department of Health Services Management, School of Management and Medical Informatics, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Ta-briz, Iran
Keywords: Clinical governance, Hospital specialists, Primary health care, Survey, Iran

Abstract

Background: Despite huge advances in improving most health indicators, Iranian primary health care (PHC) has faced several problems in improving the quality of care inside the health care system. Developed countries with similar problems have used various models of PHC governance for improving quality in their PHC system. This study aimed to obtain health professionals’ perspectives about the suitable pillars and components of Iran's PHC governance model. Methods: A purposeful sampling method was used to select seven participants who had a minimum of five years of experience in PHC and background education in the field of medical sciences. Between Jan and Jun 2015, three focus group discussions (FGD) were conducted with seven PHC experts in Tabriz. Data were analyzed using the conventional content analysis method. Results: The eight main categories including quality improvement, management and leadership, community involvement and customer participation, effectiveness of PHC, human resource development, safety, health care evaluation and audit, and health information management plus 51 sub-categories were identified according to participants' expects about the essential pillars and components for Iranian PHC governance model. Conclusion: Pillars that suggested for designing Iran’s PHC governance model are presented according to internal informed expert’s opinions and taking into account PHC system real status. By adding the degree of importance for each component and proper performance indicators to this collection, assessing the progress of the PHC system towards excellence will be possible and it will prevent any mental judgments about system performance.    

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Published
2019-03-12
How to Cite
1.
TABRIZI JS, POURASGHAR F, GHOLAMZADEH NIKJOO R. Governance of Iranian Primary Health Care System: Perceptions of Experts. Iran J Public Health. 48(3):541-548.
Section
Original Article(s)