Nutritional Intake and Chronicity Associated with the Old World Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Role of Vitamin A

  • Vahid MASHAYEKHI GOYONLO Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  • Abdolreza NOROUZY Biochemistry of Nutrition Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  • Mohsen NEMATI Biochemistry of Nutrition Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  • Pouran LAYEGH Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  • Saeed AKHLAGHI Deputy of Research, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  • Ahmad Reza TAHERI Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
  • Bita KIAFAR Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Research Center, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
Keywords: Cutaneous leishmaniasis; Nutrition; Vitamin A

Abstract

Abstract

Background: Old world cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is known as a self-healing cutaneous parasitic infection. Host immunity has a fundamental role in the course of this infection. This study was designed to investigate the relationship between nutritional status and vitamin A intake with the clinical course of CL.

Methods: Overall, 250 patients with CL attending a dermatology clinic in Imam Reza Hospital Mashhad, Iran, were enrolled from Apr 2011 to Aug 2012. For data gathering, a semi-quantitative 302-item food frequency questionnaire was utilized. They received routine treatment protocols for leishmaniasis and 1 year of follow-up

Results: As for the 149 patients who completed the study, a deficiency of macro and micronutrients, particularly vitamin A, was significantly related to a chronic clinical disease course.

Conclusion: Imbalanced or insufficient nutritional intake including vitamin A deficiency, may influence the clinical course of CL.

 

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Published
2020-01-07
How to Cite
1.
MASHAYEKHI GOYONLO V, NOROUZY A, NEMATI M, LAYEGH P, AKHLAGHI S, TAHERI AR, KIAFAR B. Nutritional Intake and Chronicity Associated with the Old World Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Role of Vitamin A. Iran J Public Health. 49(1):167-172.
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Short Communication(s)