Population Coverage to Reach Universal Health Coverage in Selected Nations: A Synthesis of Global Strategies

  • Minoo ALIPOURI SAKHA Department of Global Health and Public Policy, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Najmeh BAHMANZIARI Department of Healthcare Management & Economics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Amirhossein TAKIAN 1. Department of Global Health and Public Policy, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran 2. Department of Healthcare Management & Economics, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran 3. Health Equity Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Keywords: Population coverage; Universal health coverage; Global strategies

Abstract

Abstract Background: This study aimed to provide tailored transferrable lessons for expanding population coverage through a descriptive lens by reviewing the population coverage policies, reforms and strategies in selected nations. Methods: In this comparative short communication, 14 countries with different status of population coverage and political economy that had successful experiences with coverage expansion were selected and categorized in four groups to study their approaches to reach Universal Health Coverage (UHC). Results: Although each country needs to tailor its policies and reforms based on its own contextual factors, the legal right of citizens to social security and health protection are enshrined in most countries' Constitution. Some countries adapted political and economic reforms to evolve their Social Health Insurance schemes. National laws to push governments to adapt UHC as a national strategy for ensuring that every resident is enrolled in health insurance schemes are key policies to reach UHC. Conclusion: A series of reforms are required to provide total population coverage through various approaches. To create an effective insurance coverage, physical merger of all insurance funds is not necessarily required. Further, the share of GDP for health is not a definite indicator to reach UHC. Finally, strong political commitment and citizens’ participation are the key issues in reaching UHC, while considering the poorest, remote and neglected population really matters.  

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Published
2019-06-03
How to Cite
1.
ALIPOURI SAKHA M, BAHMANZIARI N, TAKIAN A. Population Coverage to Reach Universal Health Coverage in Selected Nations: A Synthesis of Global Strategies. Iran J Public Health. 48(6):1155-1160.
Section
Short Communication(s)