Identification and Phylogenetic Classification of Fasciola species Isolated from Sheep and Cattle by PCR-RFLP in Zabol, in Sistan and Baluchistan Province, Southeast Iran

  • Sedighe MIR Student Research Committee, Zabol University of Medical Sciences, Zabol, Iran
  • Mansour DABIRZADEH Department of Medical Parasitology, School of Medicine, Zabol University of Medical Sciences, Zabol, Iran
  • Mohammad Bagher ROKNI Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. AND Center for Research of Endemic Parasites of Iran (CREPI), Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mojgan ARYAEIPOUR Department of Medical Parasitology and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mahdi KHOSHSIMA SHAHRAKI Department of Medical Parasitology, School of Medicine, Zabol University of Medical Sciences, Zabol, Iran
  • Hakim AZIZI Department of Medical Parasitology, School of Medicine, Zabol University of Medical Sciences, Zabol, Iran
Keywords: ITS1, PCR-RFLP, Genotyping, Fasciola hepatica, Fasciola gigantica, Iran

Abstract

Background: The detection of Fasciola species in various geographical regions is essential for health policymaking. Here, we aimed to identify livestock (cattle and sheep) related Fasciola genotypes by restriction fragment length polymorphism PCR. Methods: Seventy adult Fasciola flukes were collected from 70 infected livers of 35 cattle and 35 sheep slaughtered in Zabol abattoir, outh-east Iran (Jan-Jul 2017). Fasciola species were determined based on molecular features. For molecular detection, Fasciola ITS1 region was amplified and sequenced. A 700 bp fragment was amplified. These were digested with RasΙ enzyme. F. hepatica specific fragments were 47, 59, 68, 104, and 370, while those related to F. gigantica had 45, 55, 170, 370. Results: The two main species of F. hepatica and F. gigantica are responsible for fasciolosis in sheep and cattle in our region. From 35 Fasciola isolated from cattle, 3 and 32 were F. hepatica and F. giagantica respectively. From 35 Fasciola isolated from sheep, 4 were F. hepatica and 31 were F. gigantica. Conclusion: All Seventy Fasciola samples from two different hosts (cattle and sheep) were identified as either F. hepatica or F. gigantica by PCR-RFLP. Genotypic variability of Fasciola species was high in our region. It is recommended to assess molecular variation of Fasciola isolates in other host livestock.    

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Published
2019-05-15
How to Cite
1.
MIR S, DABIRZADEH M, ROKNI MB, ARYAEIPOUR M, KHOSHSIMA SHAHRAKI M, AZIZI H. Identification and Phylogenetic Classification of Fasciola species Isolated from Sheep and Cattle by PCR-RFLP in Zabol, in Sistan and Baluchistan Province, Southeast Iran. Iran J Public Health. 48(5):934-942.
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Original Article(s)