Association Study of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase 1 and 2 Genes in Iranian Women with Preeclampsia

  • Hamid DARGAHI Department of Medical Immunology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mohammad Hossein NICKNAM Department of Medical Immunology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran and Molecular Immunology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mahroo MIRAHMADIAN Department of Medical Immunology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Mahdi MAHMOUDI Rheumatology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Saeed ASLANI Rheumatology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Maryam SADROSADAT Molecular Immunology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Robabeh GHODSSI-GHASSEMABADI Molecular Immunology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Ali Akbar AMIRZARGAR Department of Medical Immunology, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran and Molecular Immunology Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Keywords: Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2, Preeclampsia, Single nucleotide polymorphism

Abstract

Background: Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases 1 and 2 (ERAP1 and 2) are involved in blood pressure regulation and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of these genes have been linked to preeclampsia. This study intended to assess the association of ERAP1 and 2 genes polymorphism with Iranian preeclamptic women. Methods: In this case-control study, 148 preeclamptic and 133 pregnant women were selected from the Kosar Hospital, Qazvin, Iran, during 2013-2015. In order to genotype the subjects for rs28096, rs30187, rs26653, rs3734016, rs34750 and rs2549782, rs17408150 for ERAP1 and 2 genes, respectively, Real-Time PCR allelic discrimination approach was exploited. Results: Neither allelic nor genotype frequencies of all seven polymorphisms were significantly different between two groups. Though, ACGACTT and GTCAGGA haplotypes were related with decreased (P=0.0079, OR=0.559, 95% CI: 0.363-0.861 and P=0.02, OR=0.417, 95% CI: 0.194-0.896, respectively), but ACGACGT and GTGACTT haplotypes were associated with an increased (P=0.00082, OR=3.657, 95% CI: 1.630-8.206 and P=0.02, OR=2.401, 95% CI: 1.119-5.151, respectively) risk of preeclampsia. Moreover, some positions were detected to be in linkage disequilibrium. Conclusion: Ongoing investigation resulted differently from before performed studies considering the role of ERAP1 and ERAP2 gene polymorphisms in predisposing women to preeclampsia, emphasizing on the genetic structure differences among various racial populations.  

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Published
2019-03-12
How to Cite
1.
DARGAHI H, NICKNAM MH, MIRAHMADIAN M, MAHMOUDI M, ASLANI S, SADROSADAT M, GHODSSI-GHASSEMABADI R, AMIRZARGAR AA. Association Study of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Endoplasmic Reticulum Aminopeptidase 1 and 2 Genes in Iranian Women with Preeclampsia. Iran J Public Health. 48(3):531-540.
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Original Article(s)