Potatoes Consumption and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-analysis

  • Yuanming ZHANG Dept. of Preventative Medicine, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
  • Dingyun YOU Dept. of Science and Technology, Kunming Medical University, Kunming, China
  • Nanjia LU Dept. of Preventative Medicine, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
  • Donghui DUAN Dept. of Preventative Medicine, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
  • Xiaoqi FENG 1. Population Wellbeing and Environment Research Lab (Power Lab), Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia 2. Early Start Research Institute, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia 3. Menzies Center for Health Policy, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia
  • Thomas ASTELL-BURT 1. Population Wellbeing and Environment Research Lab (Power Lab), Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia 2. Early Start Research Institute, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, 2522, Australia 3. Menzies Center for Health Policy, School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Aus-tralia
  • Pan ZHU Dept. of Preventative Medicine, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
  • Liyuan HAN Dept. of Preventative Medicine, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
  • Shiwei DUAN Dept. of Preventative Medicine, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
  • Zuquan ZOU Dept. of Preventative Medicine, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Pathophysiology, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China
Keywords: Type 2 diabetes, Potatoes, French fries

Abstract

Background: Evidence of increased type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk associated with potatoes consumption is equivocal. We aimed to perform a meta-analyses on the association between potatoes consumption and T2D risk in prospective cohort studies. Methods: Studies published prior to 31 Aug 2016 were identified in PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science. Pooled relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) based upon the highest vs. lowest category of potatoes consumption in each study were calculated in meta-analysis using random-effects models. Dose-response meta-analysis was fitted using generalized least squares regression in order to quantify the association between potatoes consumption and T2D risk. Results: The pooled RR comparing the highest vs. lowest category of potato consumption was 1.077 (95%CI: 1.005, 1.155). Dose-response meta-analysis revealed T2D risk increased 3.5% (RR=1.035, 95% CI: 1.004-1.067) for additional three serving per week serving of potato. The pooled RR comparing the highest vs. lowest category of French fries consumption was 1.362 (95%CI: 1.004, 1.850). Dose-response meta-analysis indicated T2D risk increased 18.7% (RR = 1.187, 95% CI: 1.067-1.321) for additional three serving per week of French fries. Conclusion: This meta-analysis support a significant positive association between high potatoes consumption and risk of T2D, especially the consumption of French fries.  

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Published
2018-11-01
How to Cite
1.
ZHANG Y, YOU D, LU N, DUAN D, FENG X, ASTELL-BURT T, ZHU P, HAN L, DUAN S, ZOU Z. Potatoes Consumption and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-analysis. IJPH. 47(11):1627-35.
Section
Review Article(s)